• Hike to Devil’s Kitchen, seven sacred pools
    Posted by at February 19th
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    Soldier Pass-Brins Mesa-Cibola Pass-Jordan Trails Loop
    Coconino National Forest, Sedona
    Devil’s Kitchen
    Seven Sacred Pools
    For a short trek, this little loop packs in plenty of variety.  First up, is Devil’s Kitchen—Arizona’s largest sinkhole. Formed by a series of catastrophic geological events, the whole will continue to grow over time and the AZ Geological Survey considers the area unstable and hazardous. Although it might look tempting, the sinkhole is just not safe to explore.  A link below leads to an AZGS article about Devil’s Kitchen and includes lots of interesting maps and data.   Beyond the slump, look to the left to see the “seven sacred pools”, a chain of shallow ponds scoured from red sandstone that reflect both blue sky and colorfully-layered canyon walls. In under a mile, all sense of town is swallowed up as the trail enters Red Rock Secret Canyon Wilderness.  Here, an unsigned, but obvious footpath heads right for a quarter-mile side trip to the Soldier Pass Arches.  A slightly steep climb tops out beneath.  Beyond the arches, the route makes its final ascent to the Brins Mesa junction.  At just under 5,000′ the views here are breathtaking and breath saving as it’s all downhill trekking from here.  Continuing southeast on the Brins Mesa Trail, the route dives into a canyon land of Paleozoic-age sandstones singed by the 2006 Brins Fire.  A haunting landscape of blackened stubble mixed in with junipers, cypress and oak trees spackling the gorges in earthy shades of green.  A mid-segment lookout point provides unobstructed vistas of Sedona, and sometimes, graceful waterfalls can be seen washing over distant crags.
    HIKE DIRECTIONS:
    From the trailhead, follow the access path 0.2 mile to the first junction and turn left to pick up the Soldier Pass Trail.  Hike roughly 0.7 mile to the wilderness sign where an optional side path leads to a series of natural arches.  This side trip will add 0.5 mile to the hike.  Continue another 1.0 mile on Soldier Pass to Brins Mesa Trail.  Turn right here and hike 2.0 miles to the Cibola Trail, turn right and go 0.6 mile to Jordan Trail, turn right again and hike 0.3 mile to the Soldier Pass junction, turn left and hike 0.2 mile back to the trailhead.
    LENGTH:  5-mile loop (5.5 with arches detour)
    RATING: moderate
    ELEVATION:  4,450′- 4,930′
    FEE: A Red Rock Pass is required.  $5 daily fee per vehicle.
    http://www.redrockcountry.org/passes-and-permits/index.shtml
    HOURS: the Soldier Pass trailhead is gated and open only from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
    There’s alternate access off Jordan Road.
    GETTING THERE:
    From Phoenix, go north on I17 to exit 298 for Sedona/Oak Creek. Turn left (west) onto SR179 and continue to the traffic circle intersection at SR89A.  Veer left through the circle heading toward Cottonwood on SR89A.  Between milepost 372 and 373, turn right onto Soldier Pass Road, drive 1.5 miles to Rim Shadows, turn right and continue 0.25 mile to the short drive to the trailhead on the left.
    INFO: Coconino National Forest, Red Rock Ranger District ,928-203-2900
    GEOLOGY ARTICLE


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    Arizona Hiking

    Post Author: Arizona Hiking


    Bio: Serial blogger, manic hiker and “mom” to a dozen adopted dogs, Mare Czinar has been exploring Arizona trails for more than 20 years. After being led astray (or just plain confused) by outdated hiking books and online resources (hence the tagline: We got lost, so you don’t have to), Czinar sought to create a fully vetted, frequently updated online hike travelogue with current driving and hiking directions to spare fellow hikers the mental and physical wear-and-tear of aimless wandering. In addition, blog entries are amended when road closures or wildfires restrict trail access. When not working, blogging, writing about the great outdoors or picking up dog poo, Czinar attempts to “stay found” while checking out new trails.


    Website: http://arizonahiking.blogspot.com/